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Great Canadian Plate Index

Great Canadian Commemorative Plates Index 1837-1901 - 2

Great Canadian Heritage Treasures
Sudan & Boer War 1898-1902
To learn more about the people, places, and events below, use our Search engine or Google.
Lord Kitchener, The Sirdar, Type 1 - 1898 Lord Kitchener, Type 2 - 1898 Lord Kitchener, Type 3 - 1899

General Sir George White - 1900
General Sir Redvers Buller, Type 1 - 1900 General Sir Redvers Buller, Type 2 - 1900 General Sir Redvers Buller, Type 3 - 1900
General Sir Redvers Buller, Type 4 - 1900 Generals French, Macdonald, White - 1900 Joseph Chamberlain - 1899
Lord Roberts - Type 1 - 1899 Lord Roberts - Type 2 - 1900 Lord Roberts - Type 3 - 1900
Lord Roberts - Type 4 - 1900 Lord Roberts - Type 5 - 1900 Lord Kitchener & General Buller - 1900

Col/General Baden-Powell - Type 1 - 1900 Col/General Baden-Powell - Type 2 - 1900
General Hector Macdonald - Type 1 - 1900 General Hector Macdonald - Type 2 - 1900 General Gatacre - 1900
General French - Type 1 - 1900 General French - Type 2 - 1900 General French - Type 3 - 1900

General French - Type 4 - 1900
Battle of Paardeberg - Feb 18, 1900 Boers Surrender at Paardeberg - Feb 27, 1900 Majuba - Wiping Something off the Slate - 1900

Mafeking Relieved - May 1900 Pretoria Relieved - June 1900
With Britain, Heart & Soul - Canada - 1900 Gentleman in Kharki - 1900 Each Doing His Country's Work - 1900
The Army - Foley - 1900 Boer War Gunners - 1900 Boer War Soldiers - 1900

Queen Victoria & Her Generals - 1900 Boer War - Lowe - 1900
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The Boer War - No war before, or since, has produced the blizzard of memorabilia items that the Anglo-Boer War produced, in metal, tin, wood, paper, fabric, and ceramics.

Jugs, pitchers, teapots, creamers, cups and saucers, pin trays, of every size and shape were issued, but always bearing the same few transfers, over and over again. The commemorative potters ran out of generals... but never out of new sizes and shapes of ceramics, to press their transfers on to.

The plates below are but a smattering of the wide variety of plate styles that were produced.

Commemorative plates were made to celebrate people, places, and events that once transfixed the psyche of a nation. By buying commemorative plates people could - vicariously - be part of a grand national happening that - for a brief moment - allowed them to escape the trials and tribulations of their daily grind.

To understand the amazingly complex layers of history that lie behind each commemorative plate - and raise it far above the merely "pretty" Gallé lamp or a cute Royal Doulton figurine, like the Bag Lady - see: